Teen Mom, You’re Stronger than You Think – Tricia Goyer

Teen Mom: You're Stronger than You Think Tricia Goyer

QUICK HIT: If I as a youth leader ever had to deal with this, I would do so with a hug and assurance, but also this book. Teen Mom: You’re Stronger than You Think provides what I can’t—real proof that this is not the end, real motivation that redemption can be made. Tricia Goyer writes with the perspective of a teen mom because she was one, providing even more proof that teen pregnancy, though rough, does not have to be cataclysmic and irreparable.

Teen pregnancy has been described as an epidemic. Like a disease that needs to be eradicated. Secularists praise freedom of expression in the realm of sexuality and explain it as a natural behavior—but always caution against pregnancy. Religionists seek to shut it down entirely, rightly condemning sex outside of marriage but often, and sometimes unintentionally, condemning the teen.

The result is that, at a point when they need the most support in their lives, teen moms often have the least. School is now different. Family is now different. Church is definitely different. Even if you’re repentant of your sin, the consequences are still large and glaring. It’s difficult to reconcile the joy and happiness that should accompany pregnancy with a situation that nobody sees as ideal or desirable or good.

In Teen Mom, Tricia Goyer delicately dances through all of that, acknowledging the past but focusing on the future. I love that she begins with chapters dealing with importance and identity, two things that moms of any age can struggle with, but especially pertinent for teen moms. Goyer strikes the balance between the girl and the woman, the woman and the mom, reminding young moms that while motherhood will affect their identity, they still retain their individuality.

Throughout the book, Goyer inserts quotes from actual teen moms that, aside from their pertinence and wisdom, tell the teen moms reading quite clearly that they are not alone. For those of us reading the book as parents or youth leaders or any non-teen mom, it provides us with actual concrete context for the book.

If I as a youth leader ever had to deal with this, I would do so with a hug and assurance, but also this book. Because this book provides what I can’t—real proof that this is not the end, real motivation that redemption can be made. Goyer writes with the perspective of a teen mom because she was one, providing even more proof that teen pregnancy, though rough, does not have to be cataclysmic and irreparable.

I really cannot recommend this enough. Teen moms have had so many bad things said about them. Let’s begin to change that.