Street God – Dimas Salaberrios

Street God Dimas Salaberrios

QUICK HIT: Street God is an intense, mouth-punch of a memoir that shows God at work even in the worst of situations through the worst of people for his glory. And it shows that actually giving everything up for God isn’t always a clean or easy process. The addictions don’t always fade. The warrants certainly don’t expire. Sometimes you don’t even realize you’re still living part of the old life.

Dimas Salaberrios was dealing drugs before he hit his teens. It was the combined rush of adrenaline, power, and money that got to him. All three of those things a way out of the life he’d been born into. Instead, he found it suffocating him.

Arrested. Shot at. Beaten. Threatened. Always on the lookout for the next fix. Dimas’ addiction to money and power rivaled his addiction to the drugs that fueled his success in the slums of NYC. His story seemed like the end has already been written, like the storybook of his life was destined to end abruptly in a crack house either through OD or GSW.

Thoughts of God flitted into Dimas’ consciousness on occasion, but it took hitting rock bottom for him to actually reach out and accept that in order to save his life, he had to lose it. If he wanted to live, he’d have to give up everything he’d been living for.

Street God is an intense, mouth-punch of a memoir that shows God at work even in the worst of situations through the worst of people for his glory. And it shows that actually giving everything up for God isn’t always a clean or easy process. The addictions don’t always fade. The warrants certainly don’t expire. Sometimes you don’t even realize you’re still living part of the old life.

My favorite part of Dimas Salaberrios’ memoir is the middle section, the part where he’s given his life to God but is still struggling to figure out what that means. Most new Christians go through this period, but Dimas’ is exceptional. As a naïve Christian, he joyfully tithes…thousands of dollars each week from his income selling weed. You can see the blissful tension between the two. Wholeheartedly embracing the new life while still entrenched in parts of the old.

Eventually, Dimas, with warrants out for his arrest, returns to NYC to turn himself in. Prison not only helps him serve his time, but find his calling. The former self-proclaimed Street God returns to the streets proclaiming a God of a different name. The last third of the book details Dimas’ growth in faith and his ministry to the streets he once walked and the people he once served. It’s such a powerful testimony to see God make beauty from ashes and turn a life of drugs and crime into a testimony of hope and grace. Street God is a story I’ll not soon forget.